Friday, March 30, 2007

Some new papers from our group

Jarbas Silva and A. Linhares, "Cognitive reflection: the ‘premature temperature convergence’ hypothesis", accepted in the proceedings of CogSci2007, Nashville, USA.

Abstract. We present a new hypothesis concerning cognitive reflection and the relationship between System 1 and System 2, corresponding roughly to intuition and reason. This hypothesis postulates a tighter integration between systems than is implied by the common framework of separate modules. If systems are tightly coupled, as we propose here, an explanation of cognitive reflection may rest in the premature convergence of an ‘entropy’, or ‘temperature’, parameter.


..............................................................................................

Linhares, A. & Winter, C. (2007) "Internet search mechanisms and distortions of the semantic space: The scientific challenges facing the Googles", accepted at Data Mining & Information Engineering 2007, New Forest, U.K.

Abstract. Ever since the launch of Altavista, internet search engines have become a multi-billion dollar industry, with fierce competition between Google and the three major competitors. One of the challenges involved is to rank search results in a way that places the most meaningful results at the top. In order to do this, the algorithms involved must try to grasp the actual meaning, the semantics, embedded in a search query. In this paper we discuss a problem we call "distortions of semantic space". Distortions of semantic space occur regularly in people's texts, writing styles, labeling of images, etc. We present a number of examples of distortions of semantic space, and analyze the problem. We also comment on new computational architectures that have tried to handle this problem, albeit the state of the art still remains far from the needed challenge.


..............................................................................................

Linhares, A., (2007) Free will and the power of veto: convergent evidence from decision-making. Accepted in EuroCogSci, the European Conference of the Cognitive Sciences, Delphi, Greece.

Abstract. There is immense controversy over Libet’s “power of veto” interpretation of free will. This theory states that humans have free will by an indirect way: by the ability to discard, or veto, actions that are automatically provided by one’s brain (independently of one’s conscious thought or will). Libet’s theory stems from powerful, robust, experiments, which show that one’s brain prepares for an action before one is conscious of the action. These experiments have been robustly replicated, so there is not much to argue scientifically, besides its interpretations and the philosophical implications for free will. In this article, we present convergent evidence to the “power of veto” doctrine. Surprisingly, this convergent evidence arises from a field which has hitherto ignored Libet’s findings: the field of decision-making.


..............................................................................................


Linhares, A., and Brum, P., (2007) Understanding our understanding of strategic scenarios: what role do chunks play? Accepted for publication, Cognitive Science, 28p.

Abstract. There is a crucial debate concerning the nature of chess chunks: one current possibility states that chunks are built by encoding particular combinations of pieces­on­squares (POS); and that chunks are formed mostly by “close” pieces (in a “Euclidean” sense). A complementary hypothesis is that chunks are encoded by abstract, semantic information. In this paper we extend recent experiments and show that chess players are able to perceive strong similarity between very different positions if the pieces retain the same abstract roles in both of them. This casts doubt on the idea that piece­on­square information is the key information encoded in chess chunks, and we propose instead that the key encoding involves the abstract roles that pieces (and sets of pieces) play—a theoretical standpoint in line with the research program in semantics that places analogy at the core of cognition.

..............................................................................................

Anything entice you? Drop us an email and get it at 100% discount price.

0 comments: